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Chinese Domain Market Newsletter
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They were once called "something from another planet" or "black UFOs" by researchers outside China. CIA even sent spies to investigate this "suspicious Chinese nuclear base". What are they? Tulou: massive donut-shape buildings where some Hakkanese live. Now you know why Hakkanese are social and why I like people. Here's the post.

July 8, 2016 (Fri)

This Chinese drone can fly but not its domain name


Remember the domain first strategy I talked about in my July 6 post? Lenovo executives used this branding strategy to find the right domain name and then settle their brand name. Apparently, someone in the same Internet space in China is not aware of this new trend.

Look at the Beijing-based drone startup Zero Zero Robotics. They just announced an innovative product called Hover Camera, which is a small, foldable drone housed in a safety casing. The onboard camera recognizes faces to enable the drone to self adjust. You can even throw it like a boomerang!

The product idea is great but their domain decision is far from being satisfactory. They do not own ZeroZero.com, ZeroZeroRobotics.com, Hover.com, or HoverCamera.com. Instead, when you search for either the company or product name, you are led to GetHover.com. The "Get" prefix gives you a cheap image of something decided in a hurry, which may be the result of not considering availability of domain name early on.

So, what could they have done if they had used the domain first strategy? First of all, they could just consolidate their company and product names to "hover" which is simpler to remember by consumers. Then, they could set up search criteria for domain names, such as:
  • Name contains "hover"
  • The shorter the better
  • Budget: $100
To find domain names, they could use a name generation service such as LeanDomainSearch.com. Entering the "hover" keyword returned about 4,000 .com names such as HoverMagic.com, HoverFirst.com, HoverWizard.com, and HoverMaker.com. They can be registered for less than $20 a piece. (This website even tells you whether the corresponding Twitter handle is available or not.)

If they could venture outside .com and explore the new extensions, there are many possibilities. They could visit Hover.com (a large domain registrar, incidentally) and get about 400 suggestions such as Hover.works, Hover.group, Hover.systems, Hover.design, and Hover.vision. Unfortunately, Hover.camera is already a live website so is not available. Again, the cost of registering any of them is less than $100.

They could then produce a short list of domain names, examine each of them, pick the best one, and then adjust their company and product name accordingly.

Well, I don't know the company so I have no idea what the best domain name for them is. What I've written here is to show you that you can generate many decent domain names to register at low costs by using name generation services such as LeanDomainSearch.com or Hover.com. As domain names take the center stage in the corporate world, the domain first strategy will certainly go mainstream. A domain name will be comparable to a store's location in the physical world and it's an asset that should be carefully considered.